JapanSubscribe to RSS - Japan

P1-E: Japanese management techniques and African-Asian entrepreneurship

New Forms of African entrepreneurship stand at the center of the project “Japanese Management Techniques and African-Asian Entrepreneurship”, carried out by Cornelia Storz, Ruth Achenbach and Rajesh Ramachandran. During the first phase, the project focused largely on the impact of Japanese lean management techniques on the economic performance of furniture producers in Zambia. In the second phase we look at the establishment of Kaizen Institutes including their proposed management tools and how these contribute to the dissemination and application of Japanese development philosophy. The Kaizen Institutes – unlike the Chinese Confucius Institutes that have been a subject ofboth academic and popular enquiry – are a relatively new Asian institution in Africa whose objectives and effects remain unexplored. The project focuses on institutions of development cooperation, development philosophy and individual practices and imaginations of successful entrepreneurship. It zooms in on recent developments in Japanese Kaizen philosophy (e.g., the importance of distribution parallel to production) and on the perception of Kaizen programs and their appropriation and adaptation by African entrepreneurs. Of particular interest to us here is how Japan's own modernization experience as well as support for the transfer of lessons from the East Asian development experience to Africa have shaped their policy with regard to technical assistance. We analyze goals of development cooperation and their material-institutional manifestation as well as transformations of imaginations and practices of African entrepreneurs from perspectives of political science and economics.

 

Detailed description of the project by Storz/Ramachandran:

Japanese management techniques and effects on productivity: Evidence from Africa – Phase II Title - Upgrading Firms” in the Face of Demand and Supply Side Constraints: Evidence from Small and Micro Furniture Producers in Zambia

Informal firms are the dominant enterprise form in developing countries accounting for more than one-half of non-agricultural employment in most regions of the developing world – ranging from 82 per cent in South Asia to 66 per cent in Sub-Saharan Africa. These firms exhibit extremely low productivity, are typically run by entrepreneurs with low levels of human capital and produce low quality products for low-income customers using little capital, and adding little value (La Porta and Schleifer, 2014). The large bulk of business training programs that have been implemented find limited or no effects on profits or sales, and provide no clear guidance on how the profitability of these firms can be increased to enable the transition from low productive informal firms to productive formal sector enterprises (McKenzie and Woodruff, 2013).

The current project intends to understand how the school of management techniques influenced by the Japanese school of thought can help improve micro and small businesses. One of the leading lessons distilled by the Japanese through the experience of industrialization starting the 1870s, and then the period of post-war reconstruction, was the need to adapt the advanced technologies, know-how and knowledge gained from the West to its own peculiar social, institutional and industrial setting. This experience has implied the need to understand and implement management practices that are context dependent, and pliable to the institutional constraints present on the ground. The context being faced by the micro and small firms in Zambia is a combination of demand and supply side constraints. The current project influenced by theories of “big push” intends to study how a combination of demand and supply side interventions influenced by Japanese management techniques can help small informal furniture producers in Lusaka, Zambia to help overcome these constraints.

The basic philosophy underlying Japanese management techniques is the notion of small and continuous improvements in day-to-day processes through continuous measurement and monitoring. The micro and small furniture producers in Lusaka face two critical supply side constraints, one, the inability to continuously measure due to the lack of requisite financial and bookkeeping skills, which in turn prevent entrepreneurs from constant monitoring. The second crucial supply side constraint is the lack of proper wood finishing skills, which imply the inability to constantly improve their products, a key feature underlying the Japanese school of practices. As a first step, the project employing a randomized control trial (RCT) intends to study the impact of overcoming the supply side constraints through the provision of a financial and a skill up-gradation workshop. These workshops intend to instill the practice of continuous monitoring, measuring and product improvement, three core elements underlying the Japanese school of management.

The next part of the project will attempt to target the “demand” side constraints. It has been recognized in the literature that improving quality of products sold by informal firms might in fact not been beneficial as the consumers they cater to –informal sector workers – are unable and unwilling to pay for improved products. This implies that targeting only supply side constraints might fail to realize any benefits, and lead to the incorrect conclusion that entrepreneurial skills are not a constraint to business growth. The research is aimed at understanding the importance of complementarities, and the necessity of combining demand and supply interventions in the same package. The demand side intervention is influenced by the extension of the Japanese management practices to the domains of lean retailing and marketing (insert reference). The application of Japanese techniques to the field of retailing will explore the impact of provision of business development services that link entrepreneurs to improved markets through activities like placing products in already existing stores in middle income markets, access to trade shows or fairs, and linking producers with wholesaler purchasers of furniture among others. The intended intervention is motivated by the recent innovations in management practices in Japan, as well as the notion of adaptability of existing techniques to the institutional constraints being faced by the technology adopters.

Kontakt: 

Ort: 

Involvierte AFRASO Mitglieder: 

P1-E: Japanische Management-Techniken und afrikanisch-asiatisches Unternehmertum

Neue Formen des afrikanischen Unternehmertums stehen im Mittelpunkt des Teil¬projekts „Japanische Management-Techniken und afrikanisch-asiatisches Unternehmertum“ von Cornelia Storz, Ruth Achenbach und Rajesh Ramachandran. Während in der ersten Projektphase vor allem die Auswirkungen von japanischen Lean Manage¬ment-Techniken auf die ökonomische Performanz von Handwerkern in Sambia im Mittel¬punkt standen, nimmt das Projekt in der Verlängerungsphase die Etablierung von Kaizen-Instituten einschließlich der von diesen initiierten Management-Tools ins Visier, die einen Beitrag zur Verbreitung und Anwendung der japanischen Ent¬wicklungsphilosophie leisten sollen. Die Kaizen-Institute stellen – im Unterschied etwa zu den chinesischen Konfu¬zius-Instituten, die sowohl wissenschaftliches als auch gesellschaftliches Interesse auf sich gezogen haben – eine noch relativ neue asiatische Institution in Afrika dar, deren Zielsetzungen und Wirkung noch wenig untersucht sind. Das Projekt lotet das Spannungsfeld von Institutionen der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit, Entwicklungs¬philosophie und individuellen Praktiken und Imaginationen erfolgreichen Unternehmertums aus und befasst sich zum einen mit jüngeren Weiterentwicklungen der japanischen Kaizen-Philo¬sophie (etwa im Hinblick auf die Bedeutung von Distribution parallel zur Produktion), zum anderen mit der Wahrnehmung von Kaizen-Programmen und deren Aneignung und Adaptation durch afrika¬nische Unternehmer. Von besonderem Interesse ist, wie die japanische Modernisierungserfahrung und erfolgreiche Entwicklungszusammenarbeit in Ostasien die japanische Politik der technischen Unterstützung in Afrika beeinflust haben. Das Projekt untersucht entwicklungspolitische Zielsetzungen und deren materiell-institutionelle Umsetzungen sowie Transformationen von Imaginationen und Prak¬tiken afrikanischer Unternehmer zugleich aus politik- und wirtschaftswissenschaftli¬cher Perspektive.

Kontakt: 

Ort: 

Involvierte AFRASO Mitglieder: 

falk.hartig's picture

The Bandung Spirit is Alive – Really?

Asian and African leaders from more than 80 countries gathered in Indonesia in late April to mark the 60th anniversary of the landmark Bandung Conference that helped to forge a common identity among emerging states.

Category: 

Region: 

Keywords: 

author(s) / editor(s): 

simone.claar's picture

Zambia's economic strategy – beyond populist attitudes toward China and South Africa

Co-authored by Birthe Pater

In September 2011, the Zambians voted for change - a new government led by President Michael Sata from the Patriotic Front (PF). Michael Sata was well known as the ‘China basher’ in his first election campaign in 2006, which culminated in threats of an earlier Chinese ambassador to cut ties with Zambia, if Sata becomes the new president. At that point, Sata promised to recognize Taiwan as an independent country. He failed to win the election and toned his rhetoric down in the second run. But still, one pillar of Sata’s election campaign in 2011 was promises in favor of workers – job creation and paving roads. Although security standards and labor conditions increased in the mines in general, the ‘Chinese’ mines still challenge these improvements.

Category: 

Region: 

Keywords: 

author(s) / editor(s): 

birthe.pater's picture

The new African tiger?

Co-authored by Simone Claar and Sebastian Schäfer

While caught up in a regular traffic jam in the minibus to Lusaka city centre we had plenty of time to observe the people around us. We were struck by the modern life style, the variety of smart phones and fashion awareness. Thus, we were wondering about how it could be that OECD still classifies Zambia among ‘least developed countries’. Something was missing in the story.

Category: 

Region: 

Keywords: 

author(s) / editor(s): 

ute.roeschenthaler's picture

African migration to Japan

Anthropologist Prof. Sasaki Shigehiro from Nagoya University gave a lecture on African migrants in Japan. Some of the intriguing points of his talk and the subsequent discussion will be summarized here and related to reflections on mobility and migration.

Category: 

Region: 

Keywords: 

author(s) / editor(s): 

S1-B: »Landed Markets«: Zur Kommodifizierung, Mobilisierung und Entterritorialisierung von Land im Zuge asiatischer Investitionen in afrikanische Landmärkte

Übersicht: 

Im Zuge der weltweit wachsenden Nachfrage nach Land sind zahlreiche ländliche Regionen Afrikas zu begehrten Zielen asiatischer Investoren geworden. Das Teilprojekt S1-B »Landed Markets: Zur Kommodifizierung, Mobilisierung und Entterritorialisierung von Land im Zuge asiatischer Investitionen in afrikanische Landmärkte« verfolgt in unterschiedlichen Ländern Afrikas drei Teilfragen:

  • Constructed Markets: Wie wird das Phänomen »FDI in Land/Land Grabbing« in Afrika und Asien (im Vergleich mit Europa) medial konstruiert und normativ bewertet?
  • Mobilizing Markets: Wie wird »Land« im Kontext asiatischer Direktinvestitionen lokal kommodifiziert und transnational mobilisiert?
  • Negotiating Markets: Wie interagieren afrikanische und asiatische Akteure in Aushandlungs- und Entscheidungsprozessen?

Das multimethodisch und plurilokal verfahrende Projekte wendet sich umkämpften Privatisierungen von Landtiteln in traditionell kollektiven Bodenverfügungssystemen und sozio-technischen Operationen zur Einrichtung eines formalisierten Bodenmarkts mit One-Stop-Shops zur beschleunigten Landtransaktion ebenso zu wie den Motiven und Strategien asiatischer Großkonzerne und halbstaatlicher Akteure bei Landinvestitionen in Afrika mit dem Fokus auf Wahrnehmung von afrikanischen Vertragspartner insbesondere im Vergleich zu Vertragspartnern in Südostasien. Auf afrikanischer Seite wird das Projekt vergleichend in Mali, Benin, Kamerun und Madagaskar realisiert. In diesen Ländern sind es unter anderem malaysische, indische, chinesische, südkoreanische und japanische Akteure, die in jüngerer Zeit Landflächen für neue Projekte zur transregionalen Herstellung unterschiedlicher Produkte (Nahrungs- und Futtermittel, Industrie- und Energiepflanzen) akquiriert haben. Diese Vielfalt an beteiligten Akteuren und die unterschiedliche historische Ausgangssituation macht die ausgewählten Länder zu idealen Untersuchungsregionen für die Frage nach der Dynamik, die von neu geschaffenen asiatisch-afrikanischen Landmärkten auf periphere Regionen des globalen Südens ausgehen. Eröffnen sich postkoloniale Entwicklungschancen oder werden Muster neokolonialer Abhängigkeit stabilisiert? Die Perspektive asiatischer Akteure untersuchen wir einerseits über die Repräsentanz der beteiligten Unternehmen in den jeweiligen afrikanischen Zielländern, andererseits aber auch durch eine empirische Beschäftigung mit Aushandlungsprozessen in asiatischen Staaten selbst, insbesondere am häufig vernachlässigten Beispiel Japans. Neben eingeführten methodischen Instrumenten wie Diskursanalyse, teilnehmender Beobachtung und qualitativen Interviews, operiert das Projekt auch mit innovativen Techniken der »critical cartography«. Mit partizipativer kartographischer Visualisierung lassen sich die subjektiven Wahrnehmungen von Land und Ressourcen unterschiedlicher afrikanischer und asiatischer Akteursgruppen registrieren und Prozesse der kognitiven An- und Enteignung von Ressourcen und die daraus entstehenden Konfliktlinien analysieren. Gleichzeitig werden verfügbare offizielle Karten nationaler und international Organisationen sowohl in technischer Hinsicht als auch in methodischer und (ideo)logischer Hinsicht untersucht, um eine darauf aufbauende Analyse der machtgeladenen Herstellung von Ressourcenqualität, -verfügbarkeit und -nutzung zu ermöglichen.

Kontakt: 

Ort: 

Involvierte AFRASO Mitglieder: 

AFRASO Publications

Berndt, Christian & Marc Boeckler ; 2016 ; Behave, global south! Economics, experiments, evidence. ; Geoforum ; 70 ; 22–26

Talks and Lectures

Marc Boeckler ; What's in a Region? ; Friday, June 7, 2013 ; Bayreuth
Kersting, Philippe ; Marginal Lands als strategisches (Un)Sichtbarmachen von Ressourcen ; Saturday, June 29, 2013 ; Frankfurt a.M.
Kersting, Philippe ; Lang Grabbing in Westafrika - Ein Beitrag zur Nahrungsmittelsicherheit? ; Friday, October 4, 2013 ; Passau
Kersting, Philippe ; Land Grabbing in Afrika - Ein Kontinent wird neu verteilt ; Monday, November 4, 2013 ; Passau
Kersting, Philippe ; Afrikanisches Land - Eine asiatische Option? ; Tuesday, June 4, 2013 ; Goethe-Universität Frankfurt

S1-B: »Landed Markets«: Commodification, Mobilization and Deterritorialization of Land in the Context of Asian Investment in African Land Markets

Übersicht: 

The growing worldwide demand for land has turned numerous African rural regions into a much-sought after commodity for global investments. The multi-methodological and plurilocal project S1-B »Landed Markets« addresses this process from a broad set of different angles ranging from disputed privatizations of collective land titles and the socio-technical establishment of formalized land markets to the rationales and strategies of Asian enterprises investing in African land:

  • Constructed Markets: How does the media produce and negotiate „FDI in Land / Land grabbing”? How do the discourses and normative legitimizations differ across national spaces in Africa, Asia and Europe?
  • Mobilizing Markets: How is land made mobile and transnational? What socio-technical investments see to it that land circulates between Asia and Africa?
  • Negotiating Markets: How do African and Asian actors negotiate land deals (social and political participation, rationales and legitimations, evaluation and pricing, bargaining power)?

On the African side the project will realize comparative studies in Benin, Cameroun and Madagascar. In those countries there are, among others, Malayan, Indian, Chinese, South-Korean and Japanese actors involved in the process of land acquisition for a variety of different reasons (food products, animal feed, industrial crops and energy crops). Is this dynamic opening up new spaces for South-South cooperation and postcolonial development trajectories or does it rather stabilize neo-colonial structures of dependency? In addition to their presence in Africa the role of Asian investors is also analyzed through case studies in Asia, especially the often neglected example Japan.

Research methods include discourse analysis, the participant observation, qualitative interviews and critical cartography. These cartographic techniques are used to visualize subjective perceptions of land and resources by the different groups involved in land deals in order to identify potential lines of conflict. At the same time, “official cartographic representations” of national and international organizations, of investment corporations are being analyzed to de- and reconstruct the socio-technological production and techno-political definition of the quality, availability and use of resources.


Kontakt: 

Ort: 

Involvierte AFRASO Mitglieder: 

AFRASO Publications

Kersting, Philippe ; 2013 ; Sino-afrikanische Beziehungen im Agrarbereich. Gibt es ein chinesisches land grabbing in Afrika? ; Chinas Expansion in Entwicklungs- und Schwellenländern (Veröffentlichungen des Interdisziplinären Arbeitskreises Dritte Welt) ; Meyer, G., Muno, W. & Brand, A. ; Interdisziplinären Arbeitskreis Dritte Welt
Kersting, P. & Hoffmann, K. W. ; 2013 ; Landgeschäfte zwischen Chance (land investment) und Risiko (land grabbing) ; Geographie und Schule ; 201, 35 ; 11-20
Kersting, Philippe ; 2013 ; La Chine est-elle un acteur majeur de l’accaparement des terres en Afrique?Passerelles ; Passerelles ; ICTSD ; Volume 14, Numéro 4 ; http://ictsd.org/downloads/passerelles/passerelles14-4.pdf
Berndt, Christian & Marc Boeckler ; 2016 ; Behave, global south! Economics, experiments, evidence. ; Geoforum ; 70 ; 22–26

Talks and Lectures

Marc Boeckler ; What's in a Region? ; Friday, June 7, 2013 ; Bayreuth
Kersting, Philippe ; Marginal Lands als strategisches (Un)Sichtbarmachen von Ressourcen ; Saturday, June 29, 2013 ; Frankfurt a.M.
Kersting, Philippe ; Lang Grabbing in Westafrika - Ein Beitrag zur Nahrungsmittelsicherheit? ; Friday, October 4, 2013 ; Passau
Kersting, Philippe ; Land Grabbing in Afrika - Ein Kontinent wird neu verteilt ; Monday, November 4, 2013 ; Passau
Kersting, Philippe ; Afrikanisches Land - Eine asiatische Option? ; Tuesday, June 4, 2013 ; Goethe-Universität Frankfurt

S3-D: Japanische Managementpraktiken in afrikanischen Firmen

Übersicht: 

 

Kaizen in sambischen Firmen

 Das laufende Projekt ist ein Versuch, neue Entwicklungskonzepte besser zu verstehen, und das Verhältnis zwischen Kultur und Entwicklung aus ökonomischer Perspektive zu analysieren. Hierzu versucht das Projekt etwas Ungewöhnliches: Es führt in Kooperationen mit sambischen Trainern japanische Managementpraktiken, die  als stark institutionell eingebettet galten, in sambische Mikrofirmen ein. Mithin geht es darum, einen spezifischen Ausschnitt japanischer Unternehmenskultur in afrikanische Unternehmen zu transferieren und zu untersuchen, ob und in welcher Form dies möglich ist.

Das Projekt hat mit einer explorativen Phase begonnen, um passende Sektoren und Unternehmensgrößen zu identifizieren. Wir haben uns im Anschluss daran entschieden, uns auf Mikrofirmen zu beschränken, da dies die am weitesten verbreitete Unternehmensform ist; 80% der Beschäftigung im nicht-landwirtschaftlichen Sektor wird dort generiert. Typisch ist eine ausgesprochen niedrige Produktivität. An diese explorative Phase schloss sich eine Listung aller Möbelproduzenten in wichtigen Märkten in Lusaka an. Die Grundlagenerhebung („fact finding“) wurde wie geplant mit 120 Möbelproduzenten im April 2015 in den ausgewählten Märkten durchgeführt. Diese Erhebung ist notwendig, um einerseits wesentliche Merkmale der Unternehme und ihrer Unternehmen zu verstehen (z.B. Einnahmen, Gewinn, Kosten; Managementpraktiken; externe Restriktionen; Motivation und Unternehmensziele), sowie andererseits, um durch die Schulung erzielte Veränderungen messen zu können.

Die Ergebnisse zeigen, dass nur 25% der Unternehmen eine Ausbildung als Schreiner und weniger als 10% eine spezielle Managementschulung erhalten haben bzw. Geschäftsdaten verschriftlichen. Der durchschnittliche monatliche Gewinn liegt bei 200 Euro. Die Umfrage umfasst 13 Seiten mit zahlreichen Mikrodaten zu Unternehmens- und Persönlichkeitsmerkmalen, Leistungskennzahlen, Managementpraktiken, entrepreneurial orientation u.a.m., die auf Anfrage gerne bereit gestellt werden können („diagnosis“).

Vor dem Hintergrund dieser Ergebnisse und nach Rücksprache mit japanischen Managementexperten wurde ein Schulungssprogramm auf den Prinzipien von „lean management“ und „Kaizen“ aufgebaut. Die konkreten tools beruhten auf den „5S“, ein der bekanntesten japanischen Managementtechniken. Das wichtigste Ziel der Schulung war es, die Unternehmer zu einer Reflektion über ihren Produktionsprozess in einer strukturierten Form zu bewegen, um sie dadurch in die Lage zu versetzen, Bereiche zu identifizieren, in denen die Produktionskosten gesenkt werden können. Ein weiteres Ziel war es, die Unternehmer dafür zu sensibilisieren, dass höhere Gewinne nicht nur durch mehr Umsatz, sondern auch durch Senkung der Kosten erreicht werden können. Letzeres befindet sich, angesichts der starken Marktrestriktionen in Sambia, sehr viel stärker unter der Kontrolle der Unternehmer, und wurde daher als Möglichkeit gesehen, unternehmerische Initiative und „agency“ anzusprechen.

Die Schulung umfasste zwei Präsenzlernphasen („classroom session“) und vier Schulungen vor-Ort („onsite session“). Im Unterschied zu anderen Schulungen (vgl. McKenzie et al 2014 zum Überblick) legte unser Training den Schwerpunkt auf (a) praktisch orientierte Schulungen vor Ort, (b) einen kostengünstigen Ansatz. Beides ist Grundlage japanischer Managementtechniken.

Die ersten qualitativen Ergebnisse deuten darauf hin, dass japanische Managementkonzepte auch für Schulungen in anderen Kontexten geeignet sind. Dies ist an sich ein interessantes Ergebnis, da die japanischen Praktiken lange als stark kulturell eingebettet galten. Weiter zeigen die ersten Ergebnisse: 

  • Die Besuche bei den Arbeitsstätten haben gezeigt, dass die 5S in der Organisation und Produktion angewendet wurden. Insbesondere wurde dies hinsichtlich der Lagerung des Holzes deutlich. Ein visueller Vergleich der geschulten und nicht-geschulten Unternehmer dokumentiert dies sehr klar.
  • Es wurde immer wieder berichtet, dass die Unternehmer bereits unmittelbar nach den Präsenzschulungen ihr Zeitmanagement verändert haben; so etwa, indem sie Gespräche mit Kollegen über nicht-arbeitsbezogene Vorgänge zurückstellten, so dass sie bei eingehenden Aufträgen umgehend zu arbeiten beginnen konnten.
  • Ein weiteres Ziel des Trainings war es, die Zusammenarbeit zwischen den Unternehmern zu fördern, um so Kosten zu senken, insbesondere bei der Beschaffung von Werkstoffen und Ausgangsmaterial. Einer der Märkte hat begonnen, Tafeln aufzustellen, um Unternehmern die Koordination der Beschaffung zu erleichtern.
  • Andere Teilnehmer haben berichtet, dass sie gezielt nach anderen Schreinern auf Großhandelsholzmärkten suchen, um sich die Transportkosten zu teilen.

Entsprechend der ursprünglichen Planung wurde die abschließende Untersuchung im zweiten Quartal 2016 durchgeführt. Sobald die Ergebnisse ausgewertet sind, werden sie bekannt gemacht.

Lagerung des Holzes und Organisation der Arbeitsstätten geschulter Unternehmer:

Lagerung des Holzes und Organisation der Arbeitsstätten nicht-geschulter Unternehmer:

 

Kontakt: 

Ort: 

Involvierte AFRASO Mitglieder: 

AFRASO Publications

-

Talks and Lectures

Ramachandran, Rajesh ; Language Policy and Human Development. The Experience of Vernacularization in Asia and Africa ; Thursday, November 13, 2014 ; Goethe-Universität Frankfurt
Storz, Cornelia & Steven Casper (presenter) ; Comparative entrepreneurship: Social identity and strategy formulation in entrepreneurial firms ; Saturday, August 8, 2015 ; Vancouver